Monday, March 02, 2009

The Many Uses Of Animals

Grief. Between my last post and the post that follows, you'd think I had a bad Monday. Honestly though, my first day back after the week off was quite enjoyable. It's just that a few items came up that I felt I should comment on. It was with great interest that I read this story on an EU parliamentary committee decision to back a partial ban on the importation of Canadian seal products. I realize that they have made an exemption on those seal products that come from Inuit communities. Of course, there are eco-freaks out there who feel that this ban doesn't go far enough. So, because these people often herald the "enlightened policies" of Europe and because a good offense is a good defense, I thought it might be interesting to turn the tables and look at the ways animals are used in some of the European countries I've visited over the past couple summers.

Inuit like to eat seals. Europeans also like to eat animals...

pork....


chicken...


venison...


Geez. This is depressing. Any live animals for a change? This excitable fellow is kept in a castle moat at Konopiste Castle in the Czech Republic. Konopiste - the home of the unfortunate Franz Ferdinand, whose murder led to the great human slaughter that was known as WWI.


Inuit used sled dogs. In Europe, they used horses to haul coal in underground mines.


They rode them too, just like these Hungarian horses here.


This captive fellow looks excited to be here.


European enlightenment also applied to people. What you see here is a gate in Telc, Czech Republic looking out toward the town square from a small chapel. What you don't see is the wall behind me which bears the names of 30-40 townfolk - men, women and children - who were killed in 1942-43. The "enlightened reason"? They happened to be Jewish.


Let's be careful about judging other cultures when your own culture carries a lot of baggage.

1 comments:

Matt, Kara and Hunter said...

Like the post!! I just posted on my beautiful seal mittens that I finished off.