Tuesday, December 16, 2008

It's Amazing What You Can Build With A Mere 100 000 Lego Bricks

The past few years I've amassed quite a collection of harpsichord music on CD and I've toyed with the idea of owning an instrument of my own one day. Getting one of these fragile things up to the Arctic and keeping it from warping or going too badly out of tune in the dry climate here would be big challenges. Still, I can always dream. Perhaps if I just buy enough Lego bricks I can build my own, just like this one here. Oh, the things you can build with Lego. Who knew?

4 comments:

Kiggavik said...

THAT is amazing. 100,000 bricks though, not 10,000. Did you notice the lego stegosaurus in the back of the last picture (the one of him playing the harpsichord?

Kiggavik said...

I also couldn't help but wonder just how long it would last at my house... "Dad, look at the airplane I made!"

Meandering Michael said...

Wow. And not a bad sound if you can ignore the clicking from action on the keyboard.

Way Way Up said...

Clare, thanks for catching that number mistake. considering how much math and music are related, I'm surprisingly bad with numbers. I did notice the stegosaurus in the background but only after I had looked at the picture a few times. Initially it looked looked like some sort of funky wall painting to my eyes.

Meandering Michael - Definitely not a bad sound. I'm not sure exactly how that clicking sound happens. I'm not a harpsichord player by training and there is a big difference between pianos and harpsichords. You can get them on real harpsichords too. I'm not sure on this but I think the clicking has something to do with how the jack falls back after you release the key. Apparently this clicking is one way you can tell a harpsichordist from a pianist playing a harpsichord. I notice it a lot more when I hear recording of Glen Gould playing the instrument as opposed to a true harpsichordist.